Decluttering discussion thread: share your wins, ask for advice, inspire each other!

#21

Mine are deep in the opposite way. So I guess I mean they are wide? Words are hard. Here’s mine

the door is maybe 12” wide but the cabinet extends to the left 3 feet


Currently all my muffin tins, springform pans, and baking stuff in the front and random crap in the back

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#22

Oh - here’s another decluttering challenge. Shoes that don’t fit or I don’t want, but are too worn to donate. I’d be embarrassed to even give them away, honestly, we are talking SERIOUS wear. Any options other than tossing them in the landfill and thus being a poor steward of the planet/contributing to global warming?

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#23

PEOPLE! If you have stuff that is too trashed to donate and you know no one will want it, THROW IT AWAY! I am guilty of holding on to things too, thinking I can repurpose or find them a home, but all it does is clutter your home and your brain. Throw it away. You can’t be a perfect environmentally conscious person, and trying to be so only leads to madness. You can be better with your current and future purchases. Don’t let perfection be the enemy of good, or whatever the saying is.

(And with that I am going to go throw away a couple of broken pots I have been keeping around “just in care”. They are broken. I’m going to let it go.)

ETA: I am trying to give y’all permission to throw the things away, sometimes I think we need to hear that from others. I’m not trying to be judgy. :wink:

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#24

I’m sorry Buy Nothing doesn’t work for you, maybe it is harder in a big city. My Buy Nothing group is great. There are occasional flake outs, but I would say 90% of interactions are positive and people often exchange valuable things. I do live in a small(ish) city (city proper is ~ 200k but metro area is ~ 1 million) but in a single family residential (primarily - there are a few apartments scattered throughout) area, and also not n the suburbs, the city proper. I think it might make a difference.

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#25

Could be. A lot of people here don’t want to leave their immediate neighborhoods. I know that I am not going to haul my ass to the south side to go get something even if I could really use it. Maybe I’d have better luck on Nextdoor. I should try that!

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#26

Yeah, I’ll actually go through stages of “OMG, trash ALL the things!” But then one of my more environmentally conscious friends will post something about climate apocalypse and I’ll think, “wow, I’m an asshole!”

Even though I know - though yes, individual actions count - what really needs to happen is for big corporations to get on board and stop trashing the environment even if it makes their stock go down a tenth of a percentage point. And for more cities to commit to public transport, and for less polluting forms of energy and transport to become viable, etc.

You’re right, though, I’m going to trash those shoes. Or maybe “donate” them to the alley. That’s a thing here, you put stuff out in the alley and people take it. I got rid of a very warm but very trashed quilt that was full of random cat stains that didn’t come out in the wash, by draping it over a dumpster. Saw a homeless guy walking down the street wrapped in it a couple days later.

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#27

Yes! This!

Honestly, if you put something out and someone takes it , it does have some sort of value to that person, so it is worth a try to leave stuff out for a few days. If no one takes the stuff, then you truly know that no one wants it, and you can feel better about just trashing it. Stuff truly doesn’t last forever! :slight_smile:

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#28

Is it OK if I log my daily destash here?

Today I brought in a few sheets of Day of the Dead stickers that I found in a drawer and put them on the “free” table in the work lunchroom. (This is a thing at my office.) They’re gone already!

I also left a really ugly reusable holiday travel mug there. That is still there. It was given to me over the holidays one night as I was coming out of the el station. Got it home, opened it, and there was religious literature inside. :roll_eyes: Hm, maybe I should check to make sure I remembered to take the religious literature out.

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#29

I am already accumulating Things after only having my own room for 2 days. I posted some stuff on Buy Nothing. But I only have… 150 things? 200? Including food things. I still need to get more stuff than I need to give away. But I’ll be aware of not getting things that I’ll need to turn around and regift.

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#30

Ah! Yes those cupboards are a bitch to make functional. The best design of those I ever had was my last house- the door was segmented so it opened up the whole “L”, and then we had lazy susans on the corners. All our tupperware went there, it worked great. However, when I lived in my tiny shitty 1920s worker cottage, a cupboard like that was literally 75% of my kitchen storage. I did the baskets there, and just did the tetris game. A series of I think 3 baskets deep, with each further back one being the least accessed. To get to the back ones, I’d pull the front ones out then slide them over. It’s still not super accessible, but at least you don’t have to crawl into the cupboard to get the one (*&**(!@^# thing that fell in the back :wink: Super handy for small accessories too, like the little pieces that come with a food processor and so on. Hard to do baskets for upright type items like cookie pans though. So unless there’s somewhere else to move those, they’re super hard to organize. I’ve used lid holders for those though, to hold them upright, but that probably wouldn’t work well in that space!

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#31

Re: the environmental concerns, it’s also worth noting: The thing has been produced already. In many ways, the real harm has been done. If you don’t get bites for it and can’t imagine someone taking it from a charity shop… let it go to the trash.

(I say this as someone who does the same thing, oh shirt that is stained and needs to get tossed but I pretend like I’ll use it for braided rag coasters…)

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#32

Agreed. The greatest gains can be made in meditating on the past choice, and being mindful of how you can reduce waste in the future. See if you can identify patterns. Are you an aspirational buyer? are you not taking good enough care of some sort of item you own? Etc. But holding on to an object, and by extension the guilt it brings, doesn’t help anyone! Self flagellation won’t lead to growth in the same way a little mindfulness will :slight_smile:

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#33

Current state pic. I’m not gonna count my stuff, because I ain’t that girl anymore. But it’ll be interesting to see what it looks like after I get more of my stuff shipped here.

It felt like I had way too much stuff when I was carrying it all through airport security. Spread out in a room, even with more stuff, it feels like a small amount. (New since coming here: towels, a bag, jacket, boots, socks, all the hangers.)

I thought I would need to get storage containers, but the built in shelves are fine.

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#34

Well, yeah, wearing all of those clothes at once would feel like a lot :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

This room looks very peaceful. I like.


One of the hardest things for me to get over emotionally was the guilt over disposing of things that I bought mindlessly, or bought without thinking about the how of their eventual disposal.

I agree 100% that the things we already own have already met that threshold – that decision is done and was made the second I brought the item into my home. So: I can let go of guilt over broken plastic items going to landfill, for example, because that decision was made by the version of me that didn’t know better. And then, the only choice I have to make is when to dispose of it: now, when it gives me the most emotional freedom, or later, or procrastinate always and have it hanging over me always until I die and someone else is forced to deal with my past self choices.

Moving forward I can make different choices, that fit with my values and are more considered, and continue practicing compassion toward my past self for my past choices.

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#35

I’m in!

I have my old boots in my car to take to MOM’s for recycling on my way home from work today–glad I remembered this morning, since I need to pick some things up from there anyway.

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#36

I haven’t begun any serious decluttering efforts, but I did bring in two boxes of cookies that I bought because they looked good but then no one in my family liked them and left them in the staff room. Does that count?

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#37

Yes.

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#38

PTF :slight_smile:

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#39

I remember seeing a shoe recycling bin in the nike store in our CBD that would turn shoes into playground base, and they took any brand shoe, so I’ve been meaning to take old shoes there but I’m not sure they even do it anymore so yeah, i agree that past choices should be made peace with and just disposed of if there’s no other way to repurpose. So on that note, I have my first two things decluttered for the month :slight_smile:

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#40

Ooh thanks for the heads up, I’ll keep an eye out for this!

Yeah I get hung up on “how do I dispose of this?!” a lot. Cotton fabric can be composted, I’m pretty sure, so I’ll be trying that out in our new composter. Not so sure if it’s got a plastic/ vinyl print on it, though. :slightly_frowning_face:

I use old sheets for hankies. They’re great.

I ditched 20+ little domino pieces that I bought from one of the neighbour kids when they were having an adorable yard sale to save up for some big toy they wanted. These are crappy pieces that were handed out as a promotion for a grocery store.

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